The bravest piece of programming by Fiach Mac Conghail since he doused the Abbey in Amyl Nitrate (via Alice in Funderland) and his most successful artistic achievement since Mary Raftery’s No Escape, Our Few and Evil Days is a masterpiece of ‘Don’t Move’ theatre. Afraid to flinch for fear you miss a breath loaded with meaning, Mark O Rowe’s new play has you by the bollocks for its entire second act.

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Gone Girl

October 28, 2014

Gillian Flynn’s novel Gone Girl contained a twist that had readers either throw the book across the room in a fit of pique or lap it up for all it’s bat shit bananas plotting. David Fincher’s movie has a separate twist in store for those lured in by the creepy, atmospheric trailer. No pulp thriller this, but a literal laugh out loud, black as soot comedy that satirizes the occasional misandry of some elements of the media when it comes to abuse, domestic or sexual. Think the Wayan Brothers spoofing Alfred Hitchcock while trolling the feminist sounding board Jezebel and you get an idea of what the final product is like. But is it any good?

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Spinning at Smock Alley

October 28, 2014

Conor is not the only one ‘spinning’ in this Jim Culleton helmed original play from Deirdre Kinahan. All the disparate elements seem to be slightly out of control in a production that is admirable, involving but ultimately un-fulfilling.

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Northern Soul

October 27, 2014

As half-formed and full on as a teenage romance, Northern Soul may prematurely ejaculate when it comes to its plot, but it’s endearing enthusiasm for its subject makes it an enjoyable, if forgettable, watch.

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Something’s gone awry in the transfer of the DruidMurphy double bill Brigit and Bailegangaire from the Mick Lally Theatre to the Olympia stage. The intimacy and immediacy I’d imagine were provided by the small Galway venue are lost in the cavernous playing space of a location best known for its rock gigs, and the soulful grace and piercing refrain of Murphy’s text is replaced by a performative drum solo.

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Hamlet at the BGET

October 4, 2014

The play’s not really the thing, in Thomas Ostermeier’s Hamlet, which opened the Dublin Theatre Festival at the BGET last Thursday night. Rather it’s the titular Dane himself whose madness takes centre stage in this fast, furious and extremely funny take on the Bard’s most acclaimed work.

Spoilt, fat and balding, Lars Eidinger’s self-indulgent fits of insane indignation are the most marvellous end result of a society gone to shit. It’s a non-stop rollover of excess, where beer is sprayed, guns fired and food drooled onto ones clothes, as the Court of Caligula welcomes the vacuous self-appraisal of Andy Warhol’s factory.

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