Garry Hynes Interview

September 27, 2010

Tony Award-winner Garry Hynes directs a cast of 19 – Druid’s biggest ever company of actors – in this sweeping production of Sean O Casey’s most controversial play, that uses all the resources of the theatre, including live music and dance, to chart the lives of two young footballing heroes from the tenements of Dublin to the battlefields of France and home again.  Best known as the play WB rejected, Hynes hopes to restore its position in the cannon of epic Irish theatre. She talks here to Caomhan Keane.

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David Esbjornson Interview

September 27, 2010

Following the sell-out production of All My Sons last year, the Gate Theatre presents Arthur Miller’s Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, Death of a Salesman, which runs till Saturday the 4th of September. Featuring Harris Yulin, the character actor who props up movies as diverse as Scarface and Rush Hour 2(and whose guest appearance in Star Trek DS9 as the Cardassian war criminal Marritza was the highlight of the whole series) it is directed by renowned American director David Esbjornson, possibly best known for helming the first ever run of Angels in America. Esbjornson talks here to Caomhan Keane and tells him why Ireland, why Salesman and why we need writers like Arthur Miller.

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Selina Cartmell Interview

September 27, 2010

A jealous wife and mother, Two innocent children,A philandering husband, A house, A startling modern epic, If only it never happened like this… SIREN PRODUCTIONS present Euripides’ MEDEA in a new translation by  Scottish poet, Robin Robertson.Director Selina Cartmell speaks to Caomhan Keane


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Delicious O’Grady Interview

September 27, 2010

How many potatoes does it take to kill an Irishman? None! Delicious O’Grady is a tragicomedy set in the time of the Great Irish Famine (though it wasn’t that great). Inspired by the satirical works of Flann O’Brien, this circus theatre piece tells the tale of a family and its demise during the great hunger. It is a story of love, loss and potatoes. It’s star Colm O’Grady speaks here to Caomhan Keane.

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72

Anyone who has worked in retail will identify with Una McNulty’s check out girl in this warm, slightly skewed look at life on the shop floor from Iris Park.  The little things that keep you going, the thoughts that get you through the day, there all here in this involving one woman show that centres on a mousy, shy number’s attempts to be counted. From rearranging the gum and the tic tacs in a cascade of strength and color to her shy flirtations with a regular customer it is the familiar that keeps her rooted.  And when the natural order of things is broken she finds it difficult to keep her self in check.

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120

E.F. Benson’s chilling short ghost story The Room in the Tower is given a sensual makeover in Roger Doyle’s haunting new show in the Kevin Barry Room at the National Concert Hall.

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Penelope Review

September 27, 2010

119

Four flawless performances and some phenomenal writing add up to a fantastic nights theatre for those willing to trek out to the Pavilion in Dun Laoghaire. If you are suffering from Fringe fatigue it is the perfect tonic to the cheap and cheerful fair all over the rest of the city.

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There’s a great sense of bedlam evoked in Garry Duggan and Gavin Louge’s Neuropolis not least because we the audience stand and stare down upon the action, some of us from a great height. As Henry awakes in a back alley in Phibsboro, the apparent victim of a vicious assault, he has no idea who or where he is. As he backtracks over his steps he crosses paths with an array of characters from his past that may or may not be out to get him. As the ghosts of memory float on by he desperately tries to keep track of it all, scribbling furiously in his notebook, piecing back the fragments of an existence long since shattered, unable to keep stock of what has happened to him.

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121

The New Theatre have struck gold with their final fringe production The Butcher Babes which runs until Saturday. Based on the infamous Scissor Sisters, who killed and dismembered their mothers boyfriend before shoving his remains in a bag, Bisi Adigun’s black as  night comedy attempts to demystify the mystery of his final 12 hours. To put the head back on his shoulders, the balls back between his legs and  the humanity back into the barbarity.

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There’s a great sense of bedlam evoked in Garry Duggan and Gavin Louge’s Neuropolis not least because we the audience stand and stare down upon the action, some of us from a great height. As Henry awakes in a back alley in Phibsboro, the apparent victim of a vicious assault, he has no idea who or where he is. As he backtracks over his steps he crosses paths with an array of characters from his past that may or may not be out to get him. As the ghosts of memory float on by he desperately tries to keep track of it all, scribbling furiously in his notebook, piecing back the fragments of an existence long since shattered, unable to keep stock of what has happened to him.

Read the rest of this entry »